Working abroad

Gain international experience

Working abroad builds independence, initiative and adaptability – important traits that employers always value. An international work placement will give you a great opportunity to get work experience directly related to your field of study, as well as enhance your global perspective and professional network.


Eligibility and documentation

Most international positions will require you to have at least a bachelor’s degree, but there are still many options available if you have not yet completed your studies, such as co-op and internship opportunities.

If you want to work abroad, you’ll need to apply for a work permit from the country where you want to work. This can take time to organize so it’s worth planning ahead. Contact the appropriate embassy or consulate to find out what is required. If you have the option of dual citizenship (e.g. a parent or grandparent born in your destination country), you should contact the embassy and begin the paperwork as early as possible.

SWAP is a great resource if you want to pay for help arranging visas and/or locating work overseas.


Resources

It’s important to research your destination and understand the local job market, how people find work and how you can fit in as a foreigner. Here are some resources and publications that can help you get started:

Going Global
This in-depth site provides country-specific career and employment information, including country guides, job search strategies and job/internship postings for 30 countries. Access Going Global on COOL.

MyWorldAbroad
This site has articles, tips and blog posts on developing your international IQ, preparing for global work experience and finding work in a variety of different sectors. Access MyWorldAbroad through Careers Online under Recommended Links.

UBC Sauder Alumni 
Tap into the UBC Sauder Alumni Global Network of more than 36,000 accomplished business professionals in 75 countries. Contact your career coach to discuss international referrals.

Canadians Working Abroad
A must read! The Canadian government website that explains the formal, legal process of relocation. It provides easy to understand articles on ‘Unraveling the Maze’ of working abroad as well as country guides.

Monster International Careers
A great website frequented by job seekers and recruiters alike. Monster provides helpful tips and information about the transition process. Great for someone who wants a more casual position in a country that doesn’t require a VISA, as well as an established professional considering a change.

International Youth Programs
See the world and earn money at the same time! The Government of Canada has negotiated reciprocal temporary work permits with nearly 40 countries for Canadians between the ages of 18 and 35.

Work Abroad: The Complete Guide to Finding a Job Overseas 

This website also hosts a useful Work Abroad checklist.

International job postings

Look for local companies that have branches overseas or directly at foreign company employment listings. It is also worth looking at foreign newspapers for employment opportunities.

Other sites you may want to check out include:

 


Hide Menu

Explore myBCom